Breaking the Chains of Slavery

Many nations abolished the slave trade before the United States did so. And we were the only nation in which it took a war to end human bondage.
Since the founding of this nation, twelve of our presidents have been slaveholders and eight of them have held slaves while occupying the highest office in the land. Many nations abolished the slave trade long before the United States did so. And we were the only nation in which it took a war to end human bondage. Of course, slavery wasn't the only cause of the Civil War, but the abolition movement coupled with new import/export taxes were seen as grave threats to the cotton states.

By the time Lincoln entered the White House, 14 percent of the U.S. population was black. The number of slaves stood at 3,950,546 with another 488,070 being free blacks. Roughly one in four southern households held slaves and those slaves represented anywhere from 24 percent to 54 percent of a state's population.

In the average confederate state, slaves were 39 percent of the population, Florida being slightly above average with 44 percent of its population held in bondage. As a result, slavery was viewed by most southerners as essential to their agrarian way of life.

Slaves in Florida worked in cotton fields, salt works, fisheries and as teamsters. Many blacks working in coastal areas escaped to Union-held areas during the war. Florida was also home to Black Seminoles, descendants of runaway slaves (also called maroons or Gullahs) who hid out with the indians in Florida's wilderness areas. In
The Reckoning, Mommer Wicks and her boys are Gullahs.